Sexton Blake Bibliography: 1933

Publishing: UNION JACK makes its final appearance on the newsstands, DETECTIVE WEEKLY makes its first ... and so begins the long and painful decline of Sexton Blake.

John G. Brandon makes his debut as a Blake author. Born in Australia in 1879, he introduced the character The Honourable Ronald Sturges Vereker Purvale, better known as R. S. V. P. to Blake readers. Brandon died in 1941.

Blake: Much information is given about Sexton Blake's family and past this year. A second wayward brother turns up to cause trouble. Nigel Blake is younger than Sexton and was obviously born after Henry Blake had left home, since the eldest of the three brothers never knew the youngest existed (see SEXTON BLAKE'S HONOUR 1907). Nigel eventually dies after the encounter but this is later contradicted in the SBL4 novel THE ANGRY NIGHT.

Generations of Blake's family dedicated themselves to the medical profession, including his father who wanted 'his two sons, Sexton and Nigel to qualify to follow him after the manner of the family'. Sexton graduated from Cambridge 'loaded with honours' and carved out a career as a criminologist. Nigel failed his exams, became a waster and brought 'the grey hairs of his old father in sorrow to the grave'.

DETECTIVE WEEKLY issue 1 gives an extensive introduction to Sexton Blake. It informs us that a list of eleven of his monographs — published in Appendix B of the German crime classic DER VERBRECHERKRIEG by Ludwig Schroeder — includes "SOME NOTES ON THE USE OF METHYLENE BLUE AS AN ANTI-TOXIN"; "SINGLE-PRINT CLASSIFICATION"; "FINGERPRINT FORGERY BY THE CHROMICIZED GELATINE METHOD"; and "SPECULATIONS ON BALLISTIC STIGMATA IN FIREARMS".

The first of the super-crooks, George Marsden Plummer dies this year (though he is later resurrected for one of the New Order Sexton Blake Library issues).

SEXTON BLAKE'S SCHOOLDAYS
by John Andrews (Cecil Hayter)

THE BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY · Issue 388 · 1/6/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: The Bronze Giant (article)

Notes: For the past three years, 15-year-old Sexton Blake has been living in Martello Tower in the Millhove district, near the south east coast, with his guardian and tutor, Dr. Lanchester. One night, Blake comes home and finds that Lanchester has been murdered. Following instructions left in a letter, the boy puts himself in the care of two of the doctor's friends. They arrange for him to be sent to school and, in due course, Blake finds himself enrolled in St. Anne's College. He quickly gets on the wrong side of the resident bully, Wightman, but makes friends with Richard 'Spots' Losely, for whom he fags. His first night is disturbed by an intruder, a scar-faced man who tries to get through the window. Blake sees him off but is left wondering whether the man had been one of his guardian's killers. A few days later, a rumour spreads through the school that the resident ghost has been seen. Blake and Losely investigate and find a secret passage running from the school to an underground chamber then on to a cave on the seafront. This is being used by a pair of criminals — Francois and Jean — who appear to be blackmailing the Headmaster. The two boys try to intercept the villains after seeing them take money from the school safe but they are captured and taken out to sea. They escape overboard and are picked up by French fishermen and landed at Dunkirk. Knowing that this is where the villains have their base, they decide to track them down. Blake snatches back the money from them and the lads make their way home. Their next confrontation with the villains ends in quicksand, with one of the men sinking under and Blake escaping by the skin of his teeth. The schoolboy eventually discovers that his headmaster had once been friends with Francois and that the latter was the man who murdered his — Blake's — parents. Dr. Lanchester had gathered infallible evidence of this crime and was, in consequence, killed. The headmaster was targeted thanks to his association with Blake. The criminal is finally cornered and makes a run for it across the Channel where he sinks and is presumed drowned.

Trivia: Sexton Blake's father, Berkeley Blake had been a top Harley Street surgeon. He became the victim of a gang of criminals after they discovered that he had formulated an invaluable medicine. He escaped from them by moving to France with his wife and son but the gang caught up with him and murdered him and his wife. Sexton Blake was taken away by a servant who gave him into the keeping of Dr. Lanchester. These details were all added for this reprint and did not appear in the original serial. For further details, see the SEXTON BLAKE TIMELINE.

This is a reprint of a BOYS' HERALD serial which ran between issues 238 and 262 in 1908. It was reprinted again in BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY issue 102 (1909). John Andrews was a stock name used by Amalgamated Press for reprinted stories when the original author's name had appeared, in the editor's judgement, too frequently.

Rating: ★★★★★ An excellent and very exciting adventure that fills in a lot of the blank spaces in the detective's past ... though these are contradicted elsewhere!


SEXTON BLAKE — SIXTH-FORMER
by John Andrews (Cecil Hayter)

THE BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY · Issue 392 · Jul. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: The Terror of the Tests (article)

Notes: After the new gym teacher at St. Anne's attempts to kill Sexton Blake, the young schoolboy realises that his arch-foe, Francois, is still alive. When he witnesses the new innkeeper in the local village signalling to a ship one night, Blake begins to suspect that the man, the gym teacher and Francois are all one and the same. The innkeeper, it turns out, is also under observation by a young girl who, to Blake's surprise, turns out to be a slightly built man in disguise, an agent who calls himself Smithers. Francois captures Smithers and takes him aboard the ship but when a storm strikes and the vessel sinks, Blake rescues his new ally. A schoolboy named Ogle then disappears. Blake and Richard 'Spots' Losely trace him to an old house that belongs to his father but instead of finding him there they are confronted by a strange ape-like apparition. They make their escape and return a couple of nights later, accompanied by a local doctor named Livesey. They discover a network of smugglers' tunnels under the building and in them a stash of counterfeit money. Following the tunnels towards the sea, they become trapped in a blowhole. Blake is caught by the rushing water shot out to sea but he survives and manages to rescue his friends. The next night they return to the house once again and capture the ape creature, which turns out to be Ogle's father, masked and driven insane by a head injury. The following evening, Smithers seeks Blake's assistance. He needs to get to London but is being pursued by Francois' men. Blake tries to help him but they both fall into the enemy's hands and are ordered to be killed. However, unknown to Francois, one of his henchmen helps the two boys to escape. Overhearing that young Ogle is captive at Francois' Dunkirk house, Blake, Smithers and Livesey race across the Channel and rescue him. It turns out that Francois is Ogle's half-uncle and has been plotting to gain inheritance of the Ogle estate. Foiled by Blake, the villain dies in a blazing inferno.

Trivia: This is a reprint of BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY issue 105 (1909). The review is based on a reading of that issue.

Rating: ★★★★☆


SEXTON BLAKE AT THE VARSITY
by John Andrews (Cecil Hayter)

THE BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY · Issue 396 · 3/8/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Crooks of the Air (article)

Notes: This is a reprint of BOYS' FRIEND LIBRARY issue 107 (1910).

Unrated


SEXTON BLAKE'S SECRET
by Lewis Jackson (Jack Lewis)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 1 · 25/2/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: Snares of the Big City (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris.

Notes: So it's goodbye to the glorious UNION JACK and hello to the considerably less impressive DETECTIVE WEEKLY. The new paper plunges straight in with the now age-old claim that Sexton Blake is a living person rather than 'merely a name or a puppet figure of fiction'. With one of the all-time greatest Blake covers (a re-working of the cover of PENNY PICTORIAL issue 429 from 1907) and an intense story, it's an impressive debut for a paper which, unfortunately, wouldn't live up to its promise, rapidly bringing Blake's Golden Age to an end.

In the Spring of 1914, Sexton Blake travels to the Cameroons to visit his younger brother Nigel Blake. He finds him in a pitiful state; a half-insane alcoholic who practices as a doctor illegally. The meeting is not a happy one. Nigel has abandoned his wife, Clare and baby son, Garry, and refuses to support them. Blake returns to England and later receives a telegram that falsely claims that Nigel has died. Nearly twenty years later, Garry, who has been raised not knowing who his real father is, has joined the police force and is investigating his first case: a sudden plethora of forged cheques. Blake also looks into the crimes and discovers evidence that Nigel is behind them. This is supported by Clare who, in a state of deep shock, reports that she caught sight of Nigel on Oxford Street. With Garry closing in on the criminal, Blake confronts his brother and gives him refuge in Baker Street after first sending Tinker and Mrs. Bardell on spurious missions to get them out of the way. He finds out that Nigel is suffering from a mental disorder akin to schizophrenia. When Garry and Inspector Martin arrive, Blake hides his brother in the bedroom. Martin reveals that Blake was seen with the suspect and insists on searching the house. He finds nothing, and leaves with Garry, still filled with suspicion. The detective enters the bedroom to discover that Nigel has gone, having escaped through the window after first removing valuables from Blakes private safe.

Trivia: Sexton Blake is grey eyed and six feet tall, with a spare, athletic figure. His family nickname was 'Tony'. He originally intended to be a doctor but trained only so far as to pass his degrees. He then transferred from medicine to other branches of science. His home is at the north end of Baker Street (previously it's been described as 'Baker Street, West').

Mrs Bardell's first name is Martha (in early UNION JACKs it was 'Maria'). Tinker was rescued 'from the surroundings of slumdom and the rough life of a London newsboy'. The author makes it clear that Blake's father died a good few years before the First World War ... a fact that is conveniently overlooked in a couple of the New Order novels. We are also told that Blake paid for his brother to move abroad 'a year or so before the outbreak of the Great War' (and, incidentally, the author then wipes out years of established history by stating that the detective's career took off after Nigel left). A page later, he has Sexton Blake searching for Nigel in the Spring of 1914. The detective is already world famous and he tells someone that he hasn't seen Nigel for 'some years'. A few paragraphs after that, the suggestion seems to be that 'some years' is actually two. To make sense of all this, see SEXTON BLAKE TIMELINE.

This was anthologised in SEXTON BLAKE: STAR OF UNION JACK AND DETECTIVE WEEKLY(1972).

Rating: ★★★☆☆ Though this is a tense and gritty tale, it is less substantial than it at first seems ... being more of an introduction for the two sequels than a story in itself. Sexton Blake's stress is described nicely but compared to SEXTON BLAKE'S HONOUR (BOY'S FRIEND LIBRARY issue 10 1907), from which the plot is derived, the story pales significantly. There's a sense of sensation for sensation's sake here; a re-treading of old ground that, along the way, re-writes too much history for comfort.


SEXTON BLAKE AT BAY
by Lewis Jackson (Jack Lewis)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 2 · 4/3/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Hats off to the British Bobby (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris.

Notes: Sexton Blake's brother, Nigel Blake has had an eloctromagnetic pick-lock built from blueprints he stole from the detective. Now he's at Crabbe's Yard with Sam Blackford, the blacksmith who constructed it. They are planning to Rob a jewellery shop named Barrymore's but they are overheard by petty thief Tich Bryson. Blackford hits Tich with a crowbar, almost killing him, and in the ensuing confusion, Nigel slips away. The farrier, believing Tich to be dead, takes the body away from his workshop and leaves it with evidence which incriminates the victim's brother, Bung Bryson. Sexton Blake and Tinker learn of the attempted murder on their way to visit Blackford. Knowing he's the only man who could make the instrument, Blake wants him put away. At Crabbe's Yard, the detective finds a bloodstained hankerchief and accuses Blackford of the murder. The farrier denies it and blames Nigel, revealing to Blake the plot to use the magnetic picklock to rob Barrymore's. Blake traces Nigel's whereabouts and confronts him but his unrepentant brother escapes. So, a few days later, the detective breaks into the jewellery shop and awaits Nigel's arrival. Nigel, however, doesn't show up. In fact, he's already been there and departed leaving the safe empty, as a caretaker discovers while Blake hides in the shadows. Switching on the lights, the caretaker sees Blake and holds him at gunpoint while the police are called. The detective is arrested. Meanwhile, Tinker is disturbed during the night by an intruder. Nigel is leaving loot from the robbery in Blake's flat, evidence to frame his sibling. Tinker tackles him but the villain gets away. Left alone and confused by recent events, Tinker reads his master's diary and discovers the truth. He goes to Crabbe's Yard and persuades Blackford to falsely confess to the robbery, thus getting Blake off the hook. Blackford himself also thus avoids a longer sentence than he'd have suffered were his true crime of attempted murder to be revealed. Blake is released and he and Tinker vow to stand shoulder to shoulder against Nigel.

Trivia: Sexton Blake has written a book examining the methods and motives of criminals. In the wrong hands, he says, it could be considered a guidebook to the perfect crime.

Rating: ★★★★☆ The battle with Nigel hots up in this story and there are many touching moments as Tinker feels left out in the cold by Blake yet still manages to come through and rescue him.


THE SILENT WOMAN
by G. H. Teed

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 3 · 11/3/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); 'Tecs of Trade (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: Detective-Inspector Thomas is called to murder at The Silent Woman, a pub run by an untrustworthy individual named Charlie Quin. While he is examining the crime scene, Sexton Blake arrives in the Grey Panther. He is acting on an anonymous tip-off from a woman whose statement that the dead man — a crooked solicitor named Felix Slater — is in possession of a stolen necklace proves to be true. Back at Baker Street, Blake sends Tinker to keep watch on The Silent Woman. As his assistant leaves, a young woman falls through the front doorway in a dead faint. Blake revives her but, while his back is turned, she flees leaving behind a packet in which he finds more stolen jewels. When Tinker is beaten unconscious by a tramp who he spotted exiting the pub via the back entrance, Blake disguises himself as a vagrant and also has an encounter with the mysterious scavanger. Later, the detective is asked for help by a friend, Major Langley, who is being blackmailed. At the Major's hotel, the detective is introduced to Baron von Kravitch and his daughter, Elsa, who turns out to be Blake's informant. The detective also realises that Kravitch and the tramp are one and the same man. That night, at the Kravitch residence, the Baron turns on Elsa, realising that she has betrayed him to Blake. He is about to throttle her when Blake crashes in through the window and subdues the criminal. Elsa explains that her father had been double-crossed by Slater when he employed the crooked solicitor as a fence. Her motive in giving clues to Blake was to try to keep her father out of trouble after discovering that he was a thief and also the man responsible for blackmailing Langley. For Elsa's sake, Blake allows Von Kravitch to escape, warning him that he will be hunted down if he continues his villainous ways. Finally, Charlie Quin is arrested for the murder of Slater.

Trivia: This is the first in a short sequence of tales featuring Baron and Elsa von Kravitch.

Rating: ★★★★☆


SEXTON BLAKE'S TRIUMPH
by Lewis Jackson (Jack Lewis)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 4 · 18/3/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Try Your Skill (quiz); Crimes Barred in Britain (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris.

Notes: Captain John Arkwright, a retired seaman, has taken on as housekeeper his cousin, Clare Peterson, and has fallen in love with her. One night, Clare's husband, Nigel Blake, who she believes to be dead and who Arkwright has never seen, breaks into the house. He manages to read a letter from Sexton Blake before being chased off by the sailor. A few days later, Arkwright makes it clear to Clare's son, Garry, that he intends to propose. When Blake learns of this, he despairs, knowing that the girl is still married. There's more bad news: Leon Kestrel's assistants Lessing and Fifette are in town. Garry receives a visit from Nigel, who is experiencing a temprorary bout of sanity. He admits to Garry that's he's his real father and tells him that his madness is leading him to commit crimes. The young police officer is shocked but determined to do his duty. He picks up the telephone to call Scotland Yard but, before he can dial the number, Nigel injects him with a drug that renders him insensible. Blake, meanwhile, travels to see Clare to tell her that her husband is still alive ... but she already knows. Nigel has beaten Blake to it and has arranged to talk with Clare later. However, with the police closing in, it becomes imperative that Blake gets to Nigel before they do. He intercepts his brother who, in trying to escape, sustains a concussion. The detective hands the wounded man over to Dr. Sarola who runs a private sanitarium and who will care for Nigel henceforth. Blake then tricks the police into carting off the wrong man. Finally, he traces Garry's whereabouts and discovers Nigel's hoarde of stolen goods ... but these then go missing, removed by Lessing and Fifette.

Trivia: This is the third Sexton Blake story to bear this title, the others being in UNION JACK first series, issue 15 (3/8/1894), written by 'Hal Meredith' (Harry Blyth) and UNION JACK new series, issue 51 (1/10/1904), written by A. G. Pearson.

Rating: ★★★★☆ A fine end to an interesting sequence of stories ... and with a good cliffhanger at the end that promises the return of Leon Kestrel.


THE FALCON OF FAMBRIDGE
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 5 · 25/3/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Mind Your Pockets (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: An eccentric individual who claims to be the Earl of Fambridge visits Sexton Blake to ask for protection. A ghostly falcon — the legendary curse of the Fambridges — has been attacking him. Blake and Tinker travel to Fambridge Castle only to discover that it's in a ruinous state. The Earl and his family live in a bungalow nearby with their servant, who turns out to be Zenith the Albino's old sidekick, Frau Gratz. Also resident in the locality is a mad monk named Simon Grot. He is distantly related to the Earl and challenges his right to the title. Within hours of the detective's arrival, the falcon attacks. Blake believes that the strange events are connected with Fambridge's interest in chemistry and deduces that there must be a secret laboratory somewhere in the vicinity. That night, a Frenchman and a German vie for Fambridge's attention. Blake realises that the Earl has made a discovery, which he's attempting to auction off to the highest bidder. He's right; the Earl has invented a substance he calls D77 that causes anything it touches to instantly decay ... and he uses it on Grot, who turns out to be the owner of the falcon. Frau Krantz, who's working for the German contingent, offers the Earl a great deal of money, which he accepts, not caring that the D77 will go to England's enemy. Sexton Blake discovers the secret laboratory and confronts the inventor who tries to kill him. During the struggle, the Earl falls into a vat of the chemical and is instantly dissolved. Blake destroys all traces of the formula and makes sure that the existing batch of D77 is very well buried. However, before this happens it takes one final victim: the falcon of Fambridge.

Trivia: This was reprinted in an abridged form in the second SEXTON BLAKE ANNUAL (1940).

Rating: ★★★★☆


THE CHOCOLATE KING MYSTERY
by G. H. Teed

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 6 · 1/4/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); A Joke's a Joke but a Hoax is— (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: Elderly French millionaire Monsieur Perrier — the 'Chocolate King' — and his wife go missing while driving on their estate. Detective-Inspector Emile Thibaud can see only one spot along the carefully guarded route where their car could not be observed and from this they must have vanished within the space of just three minutes. Thibaud promises to keep the Perriers' disappearance a secret in order to avoid a fall in their company shares but the next morning, to his dismay, a detailed report is published in a newspaper. Meanwhile, Sexton Blake is in Paris in response to an anonymous tip-off that has put him on the trail of a crook known as Slick Jim Prentice. Seeing his quarry dive into a car, the detective takes its number, which he later realises matches that of the Perriers' vehicle, as reported in the paper. He and Thibaud join forces to investigate. Blake receives another anonymous letter, informing him that only he can solve the mystery. When a car resembling the one that is missing is found, he forms a theory that is subsequently supported by the discovery of the remains of the Perriers' missing driver and footman. Blake begins to suspect that Baron von Kravitch might be the mastermind behind the events ... and this is confirmed when he catches the anonymous letter-writer, who proves to be Elsa von Kravitch. She warns him that he must act more quickly if he is to save the Perriers. Blake then allows her to depart. While investigating a bookstall that seems to have connections with the case, the detective spots Slick Jim and manages to capture him. The Baker Street detective then leads Thibaud and a squadron of police in a raid on Kravitch's property some miles north of Paris. The force is met by a hail of bullets as gunmen open fire from the house. Under cover of the battle, the Baron and his daughter escape in a monoplane. Blake and his men overpower the shooters and the Perriers are liberated from a locked room.

Rating: ★★★★☆


THE TRAMP IN DRESS CLOTHES
by Rex Hardinge

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 7 · 8/4/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Slaves of 1933 (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE BOX OF HO SEN
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 8 · 15/4/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Try Your Detective Skills (quiz); Not What They Seemed (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris.

Notes: Story features Zenith the Albino.

Trivia: This was anthologised in SEXTON BLAKE WINS (1986).

Unrated


WANTED!
by Mark Osborne (John W. Bobin)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 9 · 22/4/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Poison Pen (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: To his dismay, Sexton Blake discovers that Tinker has fallen in love with a girl named Estelle Morrow, an associate of Julian and Miriam Haynes — a husband and wife team who specialise in blackmail and dope dealing. At a dance, Estelle is approached by her former employer, a disreputable doctor named Floyd who accuses her of being a thief. Tinker knocks him down. Back at Baker Street, Blake tries to warn his assistant about the girl but Tinker won't listen and storms out. Later, Floyd is found murdered and Tinker's cigarette case is discovered at the scene. Despite Blake's efforts to thwart him, Detective-Inspector Martin initiates a manhunt for Tinker. When Blake and Martin subsequently return to the scene of the crime, they find that the safe has been broken into and emptied. Meanwhile, a disguised Tinker meets with Estelle who admits that it was she who murdered the doctor — though by accident — while trying to force him to open the safe. Sexton Blake deduces that Floyd was a blackmailer and that the contents of the safe — the evidence he used against his victims — has been stolen by Julian and Miriam Haynes. When he spies on them, he is caught and placed in a boat under a secluded jetty with a noose around his neck. When the tide goes out, he will hang. Tinker comes to the rescue and, together, they go to spy on the Haynes' residence, where they witness events that prove Tinker — and Estelle — innocent.

Trivia: Blake's brother, Nigel Blake, receives a passing mention in this story.

Rating: ★★★★★


PAUPER'S ISLAND
by Gilbert Chester (H. H. C. Gibbons)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 10 · 29/4/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); The Isle of the Doomed (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE HOLLOW GIANT
by Edwy Searles Brooks

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 11 · 6/5/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Try Your Detective Skills (quiz); Bandits Beware (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris.

Notes: Story features Waldo the Wonder-Man.

Unrated


PERILOUS PEARLS
by G. H. Teed

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 12 · 13/5/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); The Law Says No (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: Sexton Blake is visited by Flash Jim Brady, an ex-jewel thief who, after being caught by Blake and having served a prison sentence, is now going straight and running a small jewellery shop in a Yorkshire village. Brady confesses to the detective that, in fact, he is an aristocrat — and is surprised to learn that Blake already knows this. He then tells how he had recently become friendly with a girl who was visiting the village with her father. Just before departing, she had uttered the words "green ink" to him. The day preceeding his visit to Blake, Brady had received a parcel addressed in green ink. In it was a case containing many pearls and a note instructing him to guard them. When he then received a phone call from the girl pleading with him to get rid of the case as soon as possible, Brady panicked and fled the village. He now shows Blake the pearls. When he produces a snapshot of the girl, the detective immediately recognises Elsa von Kravitch. Shocking news arrives with the morning papers: there has been a massive jewel heist in Hatton Gardens and Brady, the man accused, is now being hunted by the police. Believing in his innocence, Sexton Blake offers to shelter him in his Baker Street home while he investigates the case. Detective-Inspector Thomas arrives and, unaware that Brady is hiding in a nearby room, informs Blake that the police were acting on an anonymous tip-off. This further convinces Blake that Brady is being framed. Research reveals that the man whose Hatton Garden business was burgled — Max Vramstein — might be trying to swindle his insurers and so, in the guise of an insurance agent, Blake visits the diamond merchant and gives him a scare. Vramstein reacts by racing to the hideout of Baron von Kravitch, unaware that Tinker is on his tail. Von Kravitch is furious with Vramstein for allowing himself to be rattled by his visitor and, pulling a gun, shoots him dead. He then drives from the house, followed by Tinker on a motorcycle. The crook spots his shadow and drives the lad off the road, sending him and the bike spinning off a bridge and into the Thames. Meanwhile, Flash Brady is alone in the Baker Street house when Elsa von Kravitch visits. Surprised to see him, she flees into the street with him hot on her heels. The police spot him, swoop, and arrest him. Blake is later informed of this and told that Brady has been charged with murder after the discovery of Vramstein's body. Tinker, who has been rescued from the river, informs Blake that he knows where Baron von Kravitch is holed up. The detective leads a police raid on the house but the Baron escapes. Tinker finds Elsa and takes her to Baker Street to be with a now vindicated Brady. A few hours later, though, she vanishes, presumably to be with her father.

Rating: ★★★☆☆


THE MONSTER OF PARIS
by Lewis Jackson (Jack Lewis)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 13 · 20/5/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Try Your Detective Skills (quiz); Safes That Are Safe (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris.

Notes: Ever since his criminal career came to an end, Nigel Blake has been in a private sanitorium run by Dr. Sarola. But now he turns up on Sexton Blake's doorstep, shot through the chest. He is rushed to hospital, leaving the detective with a mystery on his hands: Sarola is out of the country, yet was seen in the vicinity of a recent murder. Blake begins investigating and rapidly comes to the conclusion that Leon Kestrel has come out of retirement. The "Prince of Pretence" has already got his hands on the jewels which Nigel had stolen, plus the magnetic picklock invented by Sexton Blake — now he is after the detective's 'Crime Manual'. The detective begins to hunt Kestrel and, along the way, discovers that the villain is planning to obtain plans for a new type of submarine, which he will then sell to the Japanese. The trail leads to Paris where the detective encounters Baudelaire, who gives him valuable information regarding Kestrel's whereabouts. In the catacombs beneath the city, Blake manages to regain possession of the stolen jewels. He then foils the scheme to sell the blueprints. Unfortunately, though, Kestrel gets away with the picklock still in his possession. The tale ends with the death of a repentant Nigel.

Trivia: Nigel's death is contradicted by THE ANGRY NIGHT (SBL series 4 issue 451, 1960). So what actually happened? See SEXTON BLAKE TIMELINE for my theory!

Rating: ★★★☆☆


THE SEVEN DEAD MATCHES MYSTERY
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 14 · 27/5/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Men of the Moor (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: Story features Zenith the Albino.

Unrated


MARKED MEN
by Rex Hardinge

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 15 · 3/6/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); The Riot - and the Reckoning (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: Story features Sir Richard Losely and Lobangu.

Unrated


GAMBLERS' GOLD
by G. H. Teed

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 16 · 10/6/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Never-Open Door (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: Story features Dr. Huxton Rymer.

Unrated


THE MAN WHO STOLE LIFE
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 17 · 17/6/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; False Clues (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris.

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE NETTED MAN MYSTERY
by Gilbert Chester (H. H. C. Gibbons)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 18 · 24/6/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Fred Bennett

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Man Who Robbed the Bank of England (article); The White Rider by Leslie Charteris

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE TREE TOP MURDER
by Edwy Searles Brooks

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 19 · 1/7/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; A Bootlace and a Chain (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: Story features Waldo the Wonder-Man.

Unrated


THE MAN I KILLED
by Rex Hardinge

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 20 · 8/7/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; Robin Hood with a Pen (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: This was reprinted in an abridged form in the second SEXTON BLAKE ANNUAL (1940). It was anthologised in SEXTON BLAKE WINS (1986).

Unrated


SEEDS OF SLEEP
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 21 · 15/7/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Shadow on the Blind (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene.

Notes: Story features Zenith the Albino.

Unrated


THE BANKER'S BOX
by G. H. Teed

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 22 · 22/7/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; Mad Manhunt (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: As Jews flee Germany in droves, Baron Von Kravitch joins the exodus, using it as a means to sneak back into his native Poland, from which he was long ago banished. He knows that a rich banker named Louis Rothstein is among the refugees and that he's carrying a fortune in jewels with which to establish a new bank. At the border, when the outcasts set up camp for the night, Von Kravitch sneaks into Rothstein's tent, strangles him, and steals the jewels. His daughter, Elsa — who believes they have entered Poland to recover family treasures that were long ago hidden, and also to pray at the grave of her mother — trusts her father when he tells her the camp is about to be raided, and so leaves with him, unaware of the crime he has committed. Two weeks later, Rothstein's sons, Julius and Jacob, learn of his death and of the theft of the jewels. With this credit lost, liabilities that are maturing in London cannot be paid by their bank. Julius persuades Jacob to use the assets of a recently dead customer to cover the costs, however, this discussion is overheard by Hans Muller, Rothstein's chief accountant, and when the brothers open the strong-box in which the bonds are stored, they are astounded to find it empty. Julius takes the matter to Sexton Blake. While he is at Baker Street, his brother telephones to inform him that Muller has threatened to expose the Rothstein Bank's weakness if an investigation proceeds. Taking up the case, Blake and Tinker track Muller to Stettin in Germany and witness him meeting with Von Kravitch and a woman they later identify as Madame Borgia, one of Von Kravich's old allies and a gold-digger who preys on rich, vulnerable men. They follow the trio to a house and, when Von Kravitch and Borgia depart, they enter it and discover Muller dead. Jacob Rothstein arrives having been summoned by an anonymous telephone call. Blake realises that it's a set up and manages to get Rothstein away just as the German police arrive. He tells the banker to go and withdraw all the money he requires and to then drop out of sight, as he is now a hunted man, thought to have exacted vengeance on Muller for that man's theft of the bonds. While Tinker accompanies Rothstein to the bank, Blake disguises himself and haunts the town's Jewish quarter. Von Kravitch returns to it — to his temporary quarters there — bringing with him Madame Borgia, who is received coldly by his daughter. Elsa demands that the adventuress leaves. Her father objects, they fight, and he banishes Elsa from the house. Blake encounters her and she confirms that she and her father had crossed into Poland before then returning, and that Von Kravitch brought with him a banker's box that he appears to value highly. She agrees to help Blake retrieve it. Tinker returns and reports that Rothstein has been captured by the police. Blake, Tinker and Elsa crash into the Baron's home, hold him and Borgia at gunpoint, and retrieve the stolen jewels. For Elsa's sake, the detective gives the crook a short time to flee the country. He then hands evidence to the police and Rothstein is set free.

Trivia: At the start of this tale it is stated that previous to the events recounted, Von Kravitch had been involved in a criminal enterprise with George Marsden Plummer. Sexton Blake had foiled their scheme and the two crooks had gone their separate ways. Either this is an unrecorded story or it's SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY 384, ROGUES OF RANSOM, which I don't own, or THE CROOK'S DECOY, issue 391, which definitely features Plummer ... though, after flicking through it, I saw no mention of Kravitch.

As far as I'm aware, this is Blake's final encounter with Von Kravitch.

Rating: ★★★☆☆


THE MAN WHO WOULD NOT SPEAK
by David Macluire

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 23 · 29/7/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Woman Who Broke the Bankers (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene.

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


DECOY!
by Gilbert Chester (H. H. C. Gibbons)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 24 · 5/8/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Incidental Murder (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


FRAME-UP!
by G. H. Teed

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 25 · 12/8/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker and P. Walford

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Old Man of Allen Street (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: Story features George Marsden Plummer and Vali Mata Vali.

Unrated


THE CRIME ZONE
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 26 · 19/8/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; Six Hermit Heiresses and a Paperhanger (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: Story features Zenith the Albino.

Unrated


SINISTER CLIFF
by Rex Hardinge

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 27 · 26/8/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; Paying a Debt with Murder (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE HIRED AVENGER
by Edwy Searles Brooks

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 28 · 2/9/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Man Who Was Nearly Right (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: Story features Waldo the Wonder-Man.

Unrated


THE AFFAIR OF THE FAKE ASTROLOGER
by Gilbert Chester (H. H. C. Gibbons)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 29 · 9/9/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; A Scrap of Paper and a Match (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE DEVIL'S GAP MYSTERY
by Reid Whitley

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 30 · 16/9/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Classic of Imperfect Crimes (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE SECRET OF THE SLUMS
by G. H. Teed

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 31 · 23/9/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Fred Bennett

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; A Shooting Party Was Arranged (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: George Marsden Plummer dies in this issue.

Unrated


DEATH IN THE MINE
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 32 · 30/9/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Amazing Mr Worth (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene.

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


POOL OF ESCAPE
by Edwy Searles Brooks

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 33 · 7/10/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Glossop

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; He Made George Washington Tell a Lie (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene.

Notes: Story features Hon. Eustace Cavendish.

Unrated


THE SINGING CLUE
by Frank Lelland (A. McLelland Burrage)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 34 · 14/10/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Bonnot Murder Bandits (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE STOLEN LION MYSTERY
by Rex Hardinge

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 35 · 21/10/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; A Tragedy of Errors (article); The Book of Fate by Anthony Skene; A Scoop That Got the Lawyers Guessing (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


BLACK TRAFFIC!
by G. H. Teed

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 36 · 28/10/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Lang

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Poison Queen of Paris (article); Shouts of Silence by David R. Solomon

Notes: Story features Mlle. Roxane.

Unrated


THE GREAT ROCKET MYSTERY
by Robert L. Hadfield

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 37 · 4/11/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; They Stole a Steamship (article); Shouts of Silence by David R. Solomon

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE KING CROOK'S COMEBACK
by Gwyn Evans

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 38 · 11/11/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; Two Crimes With But a Single Plot (article); Arsene Lupin the Elusive by Maurice Leblanc

Notes: Story features Splash Page.

Unrated


CONSPIRACY IN CUBA
by Gilbert Chester (H. H. C. Gibbons)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 39 · 18/11/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Mystery of Gorse Hill (article); Arsene Lupin the Elusive by Maurice Leblanc

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE BLOOD BROTHERS OF FORMOSA
by G. H. Teed

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 40 · 25/11/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; The Tell-Tale Bullet (article); Arsene Lupin the Elusive by Maurice Leblanc.

Notes: Story features Mlle. Roxane.

Unrated


THE DOOMSMAN OF THE DOUBLE FOUR
by Gwyn Evans

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 41 · 2/12/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; Wanted - Dead or Alive (article); Arsene Lupin the Elusive by Maurice Leblanc

Notes: Story features Splash Page.

Unrated


THE MUSIC HALL MURDER MYSTERY
by Rex Hardinge

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 42 · 9/12/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); Tinker's Notebook; Did Mrs Maybrick Get Justice? (article); Arsene Lupin the Elusive by Maurice Leblanc

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE CHRISTMAS CIRCUS MYSTERY
by Gwyn Evans

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 43 · 16/12/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); A Sea-Side Christmas Crime (article); Tinker's Notebook; Arsene Lupine the Elusive by Maurice Leblanc.

Notes: Story features Splash Page. This was the last issue of the DETECTIVE WEEKLY to be published under the editorial guidance of H. W. Twyman.

Unrated


THE CLUE OF THE CRIMSON SNOW
by Donald Stuart

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 44 · 23/12/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); £10,000 Reward - Will Be Paid... (article); Tinker's Notebook; Arsene Lupine the Elusive by Maurice Leblanc

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE LEGACY OF DOOM
by Paul Urquhart (L. L. Day Black)

DETECTIVE WEEKLY · Issue 45 · 30/12/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Gil

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); The Murder - The Motor - The Motive (article); Tinker's Notebook; Arsene Lupine the Elusive by Maurice Leblanc

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE SURVIVOR'S SECRET
by J. G. Brandon

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 365 · Jan. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: This story marks the debut of The Honourable Ronald Sturges Vereker Purvale, better known as R. S. V. P.

Unrated


YELLOW VENGEANCE
by Paul Urquhart (L. L. Day Black)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 366 · Jan. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: Spotting the Smuggler (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE MYSTERY OF THE LOST LEGIONAIRE
by Mark Osborne (John W. Bobin)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 367 · Jan. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE DERELICT HOUSE
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 368 · Jan. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: Strange Death Customs (article)

Notes: Story features Zenith the Albino.

Unrated


THE SECRET OF THE SUDAN
by Warwick Jardine (F. Warwick)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 369 · Feb. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


DR. SINISTER
by Gwyn Evans

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 370 · Feb. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Vengeance of Yen Foo by Anon.; The Clue of the Broken Bottle (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE MYSTERY OF THE TRAMP STEAMER
by Coutts Brisbane (R. C. Armour)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 371 · Feb. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE ARTERIAL ROAD MURDER
by Allan Blair (William J. Bayfield)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 372 · Feb. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE EMPTY HOUSE MURDER
by Donald Stuart

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 373 · Mar. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE CIRCUS CRIME
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 374 · Mar. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Floating Head (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE BLACK-HILL MURDER CASE
by Rex Hardinge

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 375 · Mar. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE ISLE OF HORROR
by G. H. Teed

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 376 · Mar. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: Victims of Voodoo (article)

Notes: Story features Marie Galante.

Unrated


THE MYSTERY OF THE UNKNOWN VICTIM
by Warwick Jardine (F. Warwick)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 377 · Apr. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE STABLES CRIME
by Mark Osborne (John W. Bobin)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 378 · Apr. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: Crooked Betting (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE DOUBLE CROSS
by Paul Urquhart (L. L. Day Black)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 379 · Apr. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE FATAL FRIENDSHIP
by Gwyn Evans

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 380 · Apr. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Mystery of the West End Jeweller by A Popular Author; Fatal Friendships (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE SILENT MENACE
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 381 · May 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE MAN FROM DUBLIN
by Allan Blair (William J. Bayfield)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 382 · May 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE MOTOR COACH MURDER
by Lester Bidston

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 383 · May 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


ROGUES OF RANSOM
by G. H. Teed

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 384 · May 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


GUILTY, BUT INSANE
by Donald Stuart

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 385 · Jun. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


MURDER TO MUSIC
by Gilbert Chester (H. H. C. Gibbons)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 386 · Jun. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Muswell Hill Murder (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


DEAD MAN'S PEAK
by Coutts Brisbane (R. C. Armour)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 387 · Jun. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Euston Square Murder (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE HIKER'S SECRET
by Walter Edwards (Walter Shute)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 388 · Jun. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE PLEASURE CRUISE MURDER
by Warwick Jardine (F. Warwick)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 389 · Jul. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


DEATH IN THE JUNGLE
by Gwyn Evans

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 390 · Jul. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Whitechapel Murder (article)

Notes: My copy is missing its cover.

Unrated


THE CROOK'S DECOY
by G. H. Teed

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 391 · Jul. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: Story features George Marsden Plummer and Baron Von Kravitch.

Unrated


THE CINEMA CRIME
by Richard Goyne

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 392 · Jul. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE £1,000,000 PLOT
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 393 · Aug. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE CRIME ON THE CLYDE
by Gilbert Chester (H. H. C. Gibbons)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 394 · Aug. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: Secrets of the Sea (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE CASE OF THE STRANDED TOURING CO.
by Lewis Carlton

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 395 · Aug. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


MR. KILMER SEES RED
by Paul Urquhart (L. L. Day Black)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 396 · Aug. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE TAXI-CAB MURDER
by J. G. Brandon

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 397 · Sep. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE IVORY TUSK
by Rex Hardinge

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 398 · Sep. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE GREAT TURF FRAUD
by Allan Blair (William J. Bayfield)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 399 · Sep. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Matchbox Murder (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE SECRET OF THE LOCH
by Coutts Brisbane (R. C. Armour)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 400 · Sep. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE £1,000,000 FILM MURDER
by Donald Stuart

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 401 · Oct. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: Country House Crimes (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE MYSTERY OF THE OLD AGE PENSIONER
by G. H. Teed

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 402 · Oct. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE CRIME IN PARK LANE
by Warwick Jardine (Francis Warwick)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 403 · Oct. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Terror of Ratcliff Highway (article)

Notes: Story features Granite Grant and Mlle. Julie.

Unrated


THE VICTIM OF DEVIL'S ALLEY
by Paul Urquhart (L. L. Day Black)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 404 · Oct. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE ROADHOUSE MURDER
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 405 · Nov. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE BLACK DAGGER
by Edwy Searles Brooks

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 406 · Nov. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Muswell Hill Tragedy (article)

Notes: This was reprinted in DETECTIVE WEEKLY issue 257 as THE BLACK DAGGER CRIMES (1938).

Unrated


THE CASE OF THE BOGUS PRINCE
by Gilbert Chester (H. H. C. Gibbons)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 407 · Nov. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: Accident, Suicide, or Murder? (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE LORD MAYOR'S SHOW MYSTERY
by Allan Blair (William J. Bayfield)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 408 · Nov. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Con. Man (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE MAN FROM TOKIO
by Warwick Jardine (F. Warwick)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 409 · Dec. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


ON TICKET OF LEAVE
by Stacey Blake

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 410 · Dec. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE TRAGEDY OF THE WEST END ACTRESS
by J. G. Brandon

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 411 · Dec. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


DR. FERRARO'S FRAME-UP
by Coutts Brisbane (R. C. Armour)

THE SEXTON BLAKE LIBRARY · 2nd series · Issue 412 · Dec. 1933 · Amalgamated Press · 4d

Illustrator: Unknown

Other content: Unknown

Notes: None at present.

Unrated


THE CALL OF THE DRAGON
by Arthur J. Palk

UNION JACK · New series · Issue 1,525 · 7/1/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); From Information Received (article).

Notes: The last 'new' author to appear in UNION JACK ... but according to Lofts and Adley, H. W. Twyman thought this might be a rewritten old story by Arthur J. Patterson.

Unrated



Plus:
THE NEXT MOVE (part 10)
by Gwyn Evans

Illustrator: Fred Bennett

Notes: Blake and Co. begin to make their way back through the tunnels. However, their route is blocked by Brank and Stiletti who fire their guns at them and threaten to kill Mademoiselle Roxane. Under cover of darkness, Blake plunges into the water and allows it to sweep him alongside Brank's position. He then leaps upon the criminal and beats him almost senseless. Branks falls into the water and is carried away by the current. Blake and Tinker pursue Stiletti. Maenwhile, Dirk Dolland carries the exhausted Gilson up to the dummy house and out onto the street where he is dismayed to find himself facing Detective-Inspector Thomas.

Rating: ★★☆☆☆


BEHIND THE FOG
by Robert Murray (Robert Murray Graydon)

UNION JACK · New series · Issue 1,526 · 14/1/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: From Information Received (article)

Notes: An ex-jailbird named Carne writes to Sexton Blake to tell him that he has information concerning the whereabouts of Mr Reece. However, when Blake,Tinker and Pedro go to meet him at his tobacco shop, they get lost in a dense London fog. Attracted by a woman's scream, they enter a store and become separated. Blake finds evidence that the scream came from Mademoiselle Yvonne (though this turns out to be a ruse) but before he can investigate he is attacked and rendered unconscious by The Shadow. Tinker is confronted by Reece, who pulls a lever which opens the floor, sending Tinker and Pedro hurtling into a sewer which washes them into the Thames. The youngster is dragged ashore by the bloodhound and is found by Sergeant Mace, with whom he goes to Carne's shop, only to find the old crook dead, murdered by The Shadow. Meanwhile, Sir Philip Champion visits Detective-Inspector Coutts at Scotland Yard and informs him that he wants revenge on Reece for the murder of John Smith and will take the Yard man to where the villain is hiding. Coutts accompanies Champion to the premises where Blake was overpowered but it has been booby-trapped and he and Champion find themselves trapped in a blazing inferno. Tinker and Mace come to the rescue, having used Pedro to follow The Shadow's trail from Carne's shop. The bloodhound then follows Blake's scent. The detective has recovered consciousness and been introduced to The Shadow — a boy-like killer who happens to be Reece's son. The crooks leave Blake in the keeping of four thugs, who have orders to hang him at dawn. Pedro leads Tinker and Coutts to the detective's rescue and, led by Champion, and in Richard Test's speedboat, they all pursue the criminals who are fleeing aboard a ship. Reece, though, has planned ahead — he and his son transfer to a seaplane and escape.

Trivia: This is a reprint of UNION JACK issue 887 THE DOG DETECTIVE (1920). The review is based on a reading of that issue. It was anthologised in SEXTON BLAKE: STAR OF UNION JACK AND DETECTIVE WEEKLY(1972).

Rating: ★★★★★



Plus:
THE NEXT MOVE (part 11)
by Robert Murray (Robert Murray Graydon)

Notes: With Gilson unconscious from exhaustion, Dirk Dolland finds that he must face Detective-Inspector Thomas alone. To his suprise, the police official finally drops his obstinacy and sees events from Dolland's point of view. In fact, he insists in going into the underground waterway system to find and help Sexton Blake. However, when he opens the door of the dummy cottage a fist knocks him senseless. Brank is inside! The gangster points a gun at Dolland. Brank had been rescued from the flowing waters by Stiletti but, during that rescue, Mademoiselle Roxane had escaped and fled into the tunnels. Among the dark passages, she finds the one that leads to the wall safe. Using the combination she memorised from Anastasia, she opens the door. At that moment, Brank and Stiletti arrive, leading Dolland at gunpoint. Mademoiselle steps back from them, inadvertently entering the safe. The door swings shut, sealing her within. Blake, Tinker and Splash Page arrive. Brank informs them that Roxane will soon run out of air.

Rating: ★★☆☆☆


STOLEN IDENTITY
by Gilbert Chester (H. H. Clifford Gibbons)

UNION JACK · New series · Issue 1,527 · 21/1/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: From Information Received (article)

Notes: None at present.

Unrated



Plus:
THE NEXT MOVE (part 12)
by Anthony Skene (George N. Philips)

Illustrator: None

Notes: Held at gunpoint by Brank, Sexton Blake tries but fails to open the safe. Dirk Dolland also fails. However, he states that if he had his safecracking tools, he would be able to do the job. Brank won't allow him to fetch them, so Dolland gives the gangster the details of where to find them and Brank departs, leaving Blake, Tinker and Splash Page in Stiletti's custody. Page takes the opportunity to talk Stiletti into believing that Brank will kill him rather than share the millions in the safe. The gangster has already killed the Stutz and La Rocque, so Stiletti is quick to realise the truth of Page's statement. When Brank returns, Stiletti tries to shoot him but the gangster gets off a shot first and Stiletti takes a bullet between the eyes. Blake jumps Brank and, in the ensuing struggle, the crook's machine gun fires into the wall and roof of the tunnel and causes it to collapse. Tinker, Dolland and Page are half buried on one side of the landslide, Brank and Blake on the other. When the floor collapses under the struggling pair, they plunge down into a deep pool.

Rating: ★★☆☆☆


THE HOUSE OF LIGHT
by Edwy Searles Brooks

UNION JACK · New series · Issue 1,528 · 28/1/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: None

Notes: Story features Waldo the Wonder-Man. This was anthologised in SEXTON BLAKE: STAR OF UNION JACK AND DETECTIVE WEEKLY(1972).

Unrated



Plus:
THE NEXT MOVE (part 13)
by G. H. Teed

Notes: Tinker, Dirk Dolland and Splash Page dig themselves out of the rubble. While Dolland starts drilling air-holes in the safe in an attempt to save Mademoiselle Roxane, Tinker and Page dig through the earth and bricks to get to Blake. Eventually, they find the detective and Brank — both dead! Desperate attempts to resuscitate Blake fail. Tinker then has an idea. Taking a small jar of nitroglycerine from Dolland's safe-cracking kit, he cuts one of Blake's veins and rubs a few drops in, causing it to enter the detective's bloodstream. This kick-starts his heart, and Blake recovers consciousness. Meanwhile, Dolland hears Roxane's voice from within the safe.

Trivia: The resuscitation of Sexton Blake is possibly one of the most thrilling Blake moments ever!

Rating: ★★☆☆☆


SEXTON BLAKE WINS!
by Robert Murray (Robert Murray Graydon)

UNION JACK · New series · Issue 1,529 · 4/2/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: From Information Received (article)

Notes: Having escaped from Sexton Blake in England, Mr Reece and his son, The Shadow, drive to Paris and set up headquarters in a secret room of the Hotel des Vielle Temps. Here they meet Number 444,444, the head of the Criminals' Confederation's New York branch. Reece gives him a four-part mission: to set up a new HQ in London, to kill Sexton Blake, to recover the half million in cash that had been stolen by Villiers, and to undertake a scheme which will net the Confederation billions of pounds. Some days later, in the restaurant of London's Argent Hotel, Dirk Dolland bumps into an old friend; a thief named Ned Hatton. This man challenges him to prove that he has not lost his skill — he wagers that Dolland cannot remove a revolver from an American's room without getting caught. Dolland makes the attempt but is discovered by the American, whose name is Colonel Quartz, and is forced to sign a document agreeing that he will do the colonel one service when called upon to do so. The call comes very soon: Dolland is dining with Sexton Blake, Tinker, Mademoiselle Yvonne and Detective-Inspector Coutts when Quartz asks to be introduced. He ingratiates himself with the diners and informs them that he has purchased a stable and that he has a horse, Silverheels, which is sure to win a double even though most people regard it as a dud. A bookmaker, overhearing this, allows Quartz to place a bet which, if the horse wins, will net him millions. Coutts, meanwhile, has news: Villiers has told him where the Confederation money is hidden — it's in the flat below Dolland's! Accompanied by Quartz, Blake and Co. go there and find the strongbox. Suddenly, the lights go out and the box is snatched from Coutts's hands. Dolland thinks he catches a glimpse of Ned Hatton but they are unable to catch him. Over the next few days, Quartz lays bigger and bigger bets on his horse. When it wins the first of the two races, the bookmakers start to panic. Blake and his friends are invited to Quartz's estate for the second race. During the night, Blake overhears, via the chimney, the colonel conversing with Hatton and The Shadow. He realises that Quartz is the Confederation's agent and that Silverheels is being doped. At the second race, the police close in and Quartz and The Shadow are arrested. Hatton escapes with the Confederation loot.

Trivia: This is a rewrite of UNION JACK issue 893 A BID FOR BILLIONS (1920). The review is based on a reading of that issue. It was anthologised in SEXTON BLAKE: STAR OF UNION JACK AND DETECTIVE WEEKLY(1972).

Rating: ★★★★★



Plus:
THE NEXT MOVE (part 14)
by Robert Murray (Robert Murray Graydon)

Notes: From inside the safe, Mademoiselle Roxane tells Dirk Dolland the combination. The strongbox is opened and she is liberated from its confines. The stolen money is found within along with detailed records of when, where and from whom it was stolen. Furthermore, proofs of Gilson's innocence are found, bringing the adventure to a satisfactory conclusion.

Rating: ★★☆☆☆


VILLAGE VENGEANCE
by Edwy Searles Brooks

UNION JACK · New series · Issue 1,530 · 11/2/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric parker (cover) and Kenneth Brookes (interior)

Other content: The Round Table (ed.); From Information Received (article)

Notes: Story features Waldo the Wonder-Man.

Unrated


THE LAND OF LOST MEN
by Rex Hardinge

UNION JACK · New series · Issue 1,531 · 18/2/1933 · Amalgamated Press · 2d

Illustrator: Eric Parker

Other content: From Information Received (article)

Notes: Story features Sir Richard Losely and Lobangu. This is the final issue of the UNION JACK. It was anthologised in SEXTON BLAKE: STAR OF UNION JACK AND DETECTIVE WEEKLY(1972).

Unrated